Much to love about Phillips Gardens

There’s so much to love about the Phillips Botanical Gardens in Maryborough.

Featuring an ornamental lake, scenic walking track, picnic tables and shaded grassy laws, it’s a popular spot to sit and relax and take in the view.

Council is about to commence a process to develop a Landscape Plan for the Gardens.

The Landscape Plan will guide the management of the Phillips Gardens in Maryborough for the next ten years.

To do this, we’re inviting the community to share what they love about the Gardens and what they’d like to see changed or added to the Gardens in the future.

Why do the Phillips Gardens need a Landscape Plan?

The Landscape Plan will guide improvements to the Gardens for the next ten years.

This might include improvements to infrastructure such as paths, fencing, pathway edging and seating. It will also provide guidance on plant selection.

The Phillips Gardens has a Heritage Overlay and so, as part of the development of the Landscape Plan, areas of heritage significance within the Gardens will be identified and valued.

A Landscape Plan is required to guide how Council manage and care for the gardens and allows Council to apply for government funding for improvements to the Gardens.

What is the Phillips Gardens home to?

The Phillips Gardens is bordered by Inkerman, Napier and Alma streets in the heart of Maryborough.

It is home to an ornamental lake, grassy lawns, enclosed glass-house, toilet facilities, picnic tables, park benches, walking path with information signs, rubbish bins and shade. There are also interesting tree species as well as ducks and several other bird species.

It’s also in close proximity to the Maryborough Regional Library, Go Goldfields HQ and the Maryborough CBD shopping precinct.

In 2020, 154 botanical labels were installed at the Gardens by Council’s Parks and Gardens team. The botanical labels are now in place on all trees and significant plants and feature the common name, botanic name, country of origin and species.

The labels were made possible thanks to a $20,000 Victorian Government Growing Victoria Botanic Gardens grant that also funded the planting of number of advanced trees at the Gardens in the same year.

What is the history of Phillips (Botanical) Gardens?

A mining dam on the main lead was bought by the Borough Council as a water supply for firemen and horses in 1860.

A year later a reserve was added and in 1872 it became a botanical reserve, planned in 1875 and gazetted in 1879.

The name honours Henry Neville Phillips who was the Town Clerk from 1888 to 1935.

How can I get involved?

  • Complete the online survey below by Friday 29 October at 5pm.
  • Email: Brenton.hull@cgoldshire.vic.gov.au
  • Call: Council’s Coordinator Parks and Open Spaces Brenton Hull on 0431 295 021.